Open source

How to migrate from cvs to git

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Something that I've seen with several older projects lately is a desire to upgrade from their aging cvs repositories to something better. Today, if you've read my blog lately at all, you might be able to guess that git has become the r.c.s. du jour, and it's really, really awesome too. So you should use it.

So how to move from cvs to git? Well, amusingly for that I've got a suggestion.

Instead of going straight to git, go to subversion as a stopping off point at the server level. One key reason I recommend this is that many developers (or managers) aren't yet ready to deal with git's command-line tools while there are lots of really great graphical svn tools on Windows, like TortoiseSVN. Then, when there's TortoiseGIT available you could migrate up to git with very little work.

To do this you'll use the excellent cvs2svn, and take a look at O'Reilly's excellent cvs2svn tutorial if you need detailed help.

Then, once you get svn going as your central repository you can use git-svn to locally interact with it and to have all of the usual git gravy - create local branches, use gitosis and gitjour to directly share your code with others, all while keeping the less technically savvy users happy with their point-and-click GUI tools.

So go git yourself into the 21st century!

GitHub's importance cannot be understated

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From people understanding its appeal in comparison to alternative (and aging) tools, to the continued en-masse migration of OSS projects over there (Tracks, mootools, Apple's brand spanking new sponsored sproutcore, etc), to the sheer joy of being able to easily contribute to your favorite projects, to even more people realizing its importance, GitHub has reinvigorated the OSS development world like nothing else in the past almost ten years, I think you'd have to go back to the original SourceForge launch to find something of equal importance. So if you haven't started at least learning how to use git and Github you owe yourself a few hours to do so, even if you're using Windows. Go on! Go on, go on, go on, go on, go on!

activeCollab giving up on free edition, open-source

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The project management tool activeCollab, previously mentioned here, has just announced their pricing structure for the forthcoming v1.0 release. The key point you'll notice is that they're no longer going to have a free or open-source version available, instead they're pushing their paid releases while they "keep [the old version] 0.7.1 around." There will be two versions available, a "small biz" release for $199 that doesn't have the calendar, trouble tickets, time tracking or static pages, and a $399 version that has these. At this news I'm even more satisfied in my choice to move all my work to using Redmine.

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