Linux

SVN+SSH problems on Mac OSX

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I was trying to get SVN set up as a daemon on my OSX 10.4 (Tiger) machine when I started running into this error upon connection:

bash: line 1: svnserve: command not found
svn: Connection closed unexpectedly

Some searching later I really couldn't find anything that might have been causing the problem, other than the obvious notion that the path was not working correctly. A little fiddling later I discovered the problem - the ssh daemon was by default configured to not load any user environment files (which are used to set the command path, etc). To fix the problem I had to first enable the option PermitUserEnvironment and then restart the service:

sudo nano /etc/sshd_config

Search (control-w) for the string "PermitUser" then uncomment the line (remove the # sign) and change the the "no" to "yes". Then all I had to do was restart the ssh daemon and it was good to go:

sudo SystemStarter -v restart SSH

Et voila!

Have fun with wireless network intruders

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Here's someone who discovered his neigbors were using his wireless Internet connection without his bidding. Instead of blocking them he decided to have a little fun, first redirecting all of their web page access to Kitten War, then he set up a web proxy so that he could manipulate what they were seeing, to interesting effect. Full details, including source code and configuration, are available.

Start off slowly with Ruby on Rails (UPDATED)

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Ruby on Rails can seem like a complicated beastie to newcomers, even though its learning curve is much lower than most similar technologies it is still there, so what's better than an expertly written tutorial that shows you exactly how to get started? Three of them, that's what, one each depending on whether your computer runs Windows, OSX or Linux. With one of these under your belt you're sure to be churning out excellent web software in no time!

UPDATE: If you are running OSX 10.3 (Panther) you need to follow these instructions to get the current version of Ruby to install, the other link has instructions for 10.4:

Fedora Core (Linux) tip: manually installing RPMs using Yum

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Here's a little tip I came across today while attempting to manually install software using Yum.

One of the the really cool things in Yum is that it can not only install software for you from online repositories but it can also take care of all of the inter-file dependency hell associated with installing a 3rd party RPM file. To do this simply run the command

yum install yourarchive.rpm

and it will check all of the dependencies for you and automatically queue up the files it needs to install, just like it was getting the file from a repository in the first place. Very handy when you're beta testing software.

Another tip is related to this. When I did the above it queued up all of the extra files I needed, then complained that it couldn't recognize the electronic signature attached to the new program I was installing, specifically it said:

Public key for <filename> is not installed

A quick google later and I discovered there's a little trick you can do but are generally advised not to. You see when you're updating software using Yum it verifies that all of the software is coming from somewhere reputable, so it keeps track of the signatures for each repository it knows about. The obvious problem then is that if you're installing a once-off file there's no server to have a signature from, so it shrugs its shoulders and gives up. The temporary fix for this is to change a line in the file /etc/yum.conf that says

gpgcheck=1

Simply change that to =0 and you're away with it! Do make sure to change it back afterwards, though, you want to keep this security precaution in place for normal use.

I hope these can help others who get stuck.

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